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Infographic: GDPR for Development and Fundraisers

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GDPR for development and fundraisers Engaged contacts: A greater focus on the two-way relationship and benefits of fundraising/advancement, and a laser-eye on the supporter experience, can bring rich dividends to institutions/charities. Flexible, easy-to-access options: Embrace offering preference choices so that your supporters can receive certain types of contact or engage in certain types of activity as they wish. Make it easy for individuals to select between options, and change them over time. Transparency: Be clear at every step. Tell your supporters the benefits. Think about "what's in it for me?" from their perspective. Explain why your institution uses public domain data, profiles, etc to do things better. Be open and flexible to sending individuals less or more as they want. Trustee buy-in: Make sure your governing body, Council, etc. understand the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and risks, and then make – and communicate – the key decisions around consent and the wider supporter experience. There are many technology- and data-influenced risk factors to consider in relation to GDPR, with some examples listed here; however, with every risk there is also an opportunity to enhance the supporter experience. Losing contact: The GDPR brings added risks around losing contact with some supporters. Reaching for the lowest denominator: An inability to easily manage preferences could drive individuals to opt out of everything, even though they would have been content to receive certain types of contact or engage in certain types of activity. Unintended consequences: Repeated requests to do something, for example renewing consent, together with a lack of (their) understanding for why this is necessary, risks damaging relationships. The buck stopping nowhere: A lack of senior management/leadership involvement is a major risk to the success of any change. Some difficult decisions need to be made, with significant potential consequences, which may suffer without buy-in at the highest level. Opportunity Opportunity Opportunity Opportunity Risk Risk Risk Risk 01 02 03 04

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